broadcast

The 2nd edition of The Inkjet Conference USA – Chicago O’Hare, May 22-23, 2019. The place to be for Inkjet Engineering and Inkjet Chemistry

Programme

This is the tentative conference program. Updates will be published here on regular basis.

  • DAY 1 – Track 1 (May 22, 2019)

    Time Topic Speaker(s) Company
    08:30
    Registration and tabletop networking
    09:15
    Conference introduction
    09:30
    The challenges of enabling and maintaining digital print quality
    Xaar
    New markets, applications and their printing demands are now driving higher levels of print quality and the requirement to maintain it under more and more difficult conditions. Single-pass applications have limited capability to hide color variations and defects compared with that of scanning printers. The ability to provide color consistency is key to digital growth in many of the new markets and in some, any degree of non-uniformity is considered a barrier. In this presentation, Jason Remnant, Head of Product Management at Xaar, will talk about some of the current techniques already employed in applications and some of the newer options now available to enable digital inkjet to deliver the ultimate in print quality.
    10:00
    Integration considerations for inkjet modules
    Industrial Inkjet
    Improvements in software, hardware and fluids have generated significant advances in inkjet capabilities which have expanded the applications of inkjet technology and have fueled significant improvements in recent years. As the numbers, size, and complexity of inkjet integration projects continue to increase, it is important to understand that we still can’t overcome the laws of physics, there is no free lunch, and all the tricks and strategies in the world can’t overcome proper implementation of inkjet technology. Employing appropriate strategies with regards to application selection, engineering design, technology integration and mitigation strategies will allow continued expansion of successful applications of inkjet technology. With all of the improvements and enhancements available, it is important we don’t lose sight of the basics and keep those considerations in mind as we move forward and expand applications of inkjet technology.
    10:30
    High speed inkjet printing: A system integration perspective
    NTS Group
    NTS Group In recent years, several markets (e.g. packaging) are adopting digital technologies to print variable data which is pushing inkjet technology to achieve high speed (> 100 m/min) with high quality images (1,200 dpi). This induces challenges (amongst others) with respect to vibrations of mechanical modules (print bar), high flow rate in the ink delivery system and power supplies requirements for fast printhead activation. In this presentation, we elaborate the challenges along with their effects and propose a solution space from a system integration perspective to achieve high speed printing with desired accuracy.
    11:00
    Coffee break and tabletop networking
    11:30
    In pursuit of the perfect print: Nozzle out detection and compensation
    Meteor Inkjet
    A long-standing ambition in the industrial inkjet industry is to address print quality issues resulting from sub-optimal performance of one or more printhead nozzles. Challenges include not only the detection of failed nozzles but also on-the-fly correction in real-world, high-speed industrial environments. This talk will review both hardware and software aspects of the topic and will present the latest technology developments.
    12:00
    Color management software for industrial color printing
    ColorGATE
    Industrial printing workflows which take advantage of digital color printing are creating new opportunities and new challenges in order to specify and produce quality consistent output. Standardizing each process step is necessary on the journey towards an automated manufacturing flow over the entire production chain which at its reach provides efficiency profits that define the duration until the return of the investment. The speaker will highlight several use cases and requirements from a range of decorative and packaging applications and suggest solution approaches.
    12:30
    Inkjet in coatings and complex shapes: Technologies and processes
    Global Inkjet Systems
    Inkjet is most often considered as a graphics printing technology for flat surfaces like paper and film, but it is perhaps more accurate to consider it as a highly flexible deposition technology capable of jetting inks or functional fluids onto a growing range of substrates and surfaces. Advances in printhead technology, combined with advances in software, mean that inkjet can be used effectively in applications and environments that were not possible before. This presentation will focus on the capability of inkjet technology in industrial coating and decorative manufacturing applications.
    13:00
    Lunch break and tabletop networking
    14:30
    Controlling high standoff defects in inkjet
    Fujifilm Dimatix
    As inkjet moves into new fields for high speed single pass applications requiring high resolution images such as flexible packaging, the technology can encounter a number of challenges. It can be especially difficult controlling very small drops at high speed especially when you are jetting with a high stand off from the substrate. Here is a study in some of the artifacts that occur under these difficult conditions, especially when you combine very small drops running at high speed and then trying to work with a high substrate standoff. We will look at the artifacts, what is causing them and then we will look at some ways to help control the drops and airflow to improve image quality.
    15:00
    A systems approach to creating high quality output: The importance of an Image Quality System (IQS)
    Kodak
    Inkjet printing technologies rely on systems approach to drive high quality output. One of the key elements of this approach is the Image Quality System (IQS). Kodak’s IQS builds upon Kodak’s learnings and know-how of data handling to analyze images and apply real-time data correction which is used daily around the world, producing billions of saleable images yearly. The IQS approach involves 6 significant functions: Automated Registration Setup, Density Calibration, Stitching, Color-to-Color Registration, Page Correlation and Front to Back Registration; all which occur while printing at speeds up to 1000 fpm. The core competency of Kodak’s EISD team include image correction algorithms and image capture analysis which is automated, and yields results in image quality that the commercial print industry demands.
    15:30
    Has inkjet really achieved offset quality?
    Global Graphics
    From about the middle of last year, the consensus seemed to be that inkjet had finally attained the same quality as offset lithography or flexography. How has that consensus been reached when the areas that inkjet still finds difficult are things like large regions of mid-tone tints? You simply don’t see press vendors, or buyers, making such comparisons. Inkjet problem areas are mostly caused by non-uniformity at both the microscopic and macroscopic levels. Martin Bailey explores how these spatial variations can be remedied and discusses an emerging ISO Technical Specification (ISO TS 18621-21) that is designed to objectively characterise some of these types of variation.
    16:00
    Coffee break and tabletop networking
    16:30
    Advances in direct-to-shape printing
    iPrint
    iPrint is working for several years already on the topic of direct-to-shape (DTS) printing within a research program. This presentation will summarize the results of several basic studies and show results of the actually ongoing research. The used printing platform is based on a Stäubli articulated robot arm, which allows with its six axes a complete flexibility in the trajectories and orientation of the printhead. In a brief introduction the objectives of iPrint’s research program as well as the main problems with direct-to-shape printing on three-dimensional freeform objects will be shown. Preliminary studies will be presented about problems of printhead acceleration and orientation in robot-based printing, the referencing of the printhead to the shaped substrate surface and the stitching on shaped objects. The actual technology development step includes an automated trajectory generation and an additional system to sense and correct the print head position to the shaped object surface in order to achieve the required accuracy for high resolution printing. Some first results on trajectory generation and on a subpixel alignment approach are shared as well as an outlook and the potential of DTS in the future digital market.
    17:00
    Microscale liquid engineering: New materials and new challenges
    University of Cambridge
    Dropwise control of 2D and 3D structures by inkjet printing has already shown the potential to transform both the creation of functional materials and the business models that bring them to the end user. Emerging products and material technologies still face significant manufacturability challenges, in particular the challenge of maintaining functionality when produced in increasingly real-world manufacturing environments, at realistic process throughputs, and using standard manufacturing tools. These challenges will be discussed with a focus on three exciting and emerging inkjet research examples. Firstly, 3D structures will be explored and the drop-by-drop control of bio-inspired microstructures will be presented, with a demonstration of their ability to controllably release pharmaceuticals as coatings on medical devices. Secondly, 2D structures will be presented using inkjet deposition to deliver nanoscale control of metal oxide nanomaterial layers when fabricating sensors. Finally, the “printing journey” will be considered and the importance of understanding the role of this journey on the final function of printed materials. Through these three new examples, we show that it is critical to identify and understand the interdependencies between the advanced functionality of emerging products/materials and their associated manufacturing technologies.
    18:00
    Networking reception
  • DAY 1 – Track 2 (May 22, 2019)

    Time Topic Speaker(s) Company
    08:30
    Registration and tabletop networking
    09:15
    Conference introduction
    09:30
    High shear viscosity measurements for real condition application of inks and coatings
    Formulaction
    Spray coatings, ceramic inks, and certain inkjets are often subject to high pressures during their development and application processes. The viscosity of these often shear-thinning substances is critical to know precisely as to avoid bleeding or clogging of printing or spraying heads. Standard viscometers and rheometers may not be able to accurately calculate the shear associated with such applications and extrapolation may introduce error and guesswork into the process. We will show that a microfluidic rheometer will be capable of analyzing the viscosity of various ink-type products under a wide range of shear rates and temperature ranges. A co-flow microfluidic principle is utilized to quickly and accurately determine viscosity under real life conditions. Visual acquisition of the laminar flow interface of the sample versus a reference solution allows for entire flow curves to be generated in a matter of minutes without device calibration or cleanup.
    10:00
    Is it really all UV LED? Hybrid curing solutions for digital printing and decoration
    Integration Technology
    While UV-LED curing is becoming the ideal standard in the fast moving inkjet market the reality for UV curing in today and tomorrow’s commercial environment is that there are still hurdles and challenges for pure LED installations. Hybrid UV is a combination of UV curing technologies that are an answer to some of the technical challenges faced in the business of developing inkjet applications and moving inkjet into new markets. This paper will have a look at the benefits of combined technologies in order to get the perfect result or even open new business opportunities. In addition, recent developments in low energy, environmentally friendly, non LED sources in shorter wavelengths extend options even further.
    10:30
    Using high performance colorant dispersions to create opportunities for aqueous inkjet applications
    Fujifilm Inkjet Technology
    High performance colorant dispersions are one of the key factors in developing inkjet applications and driving the growth in industrial and packaging inkjet markets. The performance requirements of colorant dispersions are multidimensional. They are not only limited to formulation stability, reliable jetting and printing, but also deliver the critical to quality (CTQ) parameters of the intended end use applications. A "Life of an Inkjet Drop" methodology has been used as a tool to outline the requirements and role of colorant dispersions throughout the value chain starting from a pigment dispersion concentrate to a final printed product. Examples of different market applications outline what some of those requirements are and how a high performance dispersion technology can deliver them.
    11:00
    Coffee break and tabletop networking
    11:30
    Expanding the horizon with the next generation LED curing systems
    Phoseon
    Phoseon Technology pioneered the use of LED technology across a broad range of industries for curing adhesives, coatings and inks offering significant benefits to users. This presentation will include a short review of LED physics and state of the art LED curing technology before diving into what future LED curing technology from UV-C all across the spectrum to infrared LEDs might have in store for the next generation of digital inkjet printing.
    12:00
    aNIR for improved printing speed, enhanced print quality and less production costs
    Adphos
    Drying can be much more than just avoiding of ink lay-off. In this presentation the today’s available drying technologies are briefly outlined. Based on a competitive dryer evaluation boundary conditions, limitations but also opportunities for improved productivity enhanced print quality and reduced operation costs, are presented. Actual examples are demonstrated.
    12:30
    How to extend the color gamut and improve the color transition
    Encres Dubuit
    How to use different ink-color combinations to create bigger color gamut and more smooth color transition in the UV inkjet printing industry? Normally, there are cyan, magenta, yellow, black, light cyan and light magenta used in a UV printer, which has been settled as an standard ink combination. However, more other colors like red, orange, light black should be considered as options to create more possibilities according to the market requirements. This solution had been considered in the printers with water-based inks such as Epson/HP, which can be the same or even better in the UV printing industry. More and more pantones can be targeted as well.
    13:00
    Lunch break and tabletop networking
    14:30
    The winning resin technology for inkjet in packaging
    DSM
    The packaging market is embracing the advantages of digital printing and resulting in an extremely promising market for players in inkjet. The penetration of inkjet in packaging depends strongly on the segment, with labels being progressed the most and flexible packaging still being embryonic. Future successes of inkjet into analog to digital transformation rely on a strong development of the digital presses in combination with a balanced system of primers, inks and overprint varnishes. The selection of the right resin technology for these applications is complex due to the need to balance the print reliability with performance on the substrate (after dry/cure) and regulatory compliance. Long and proven successes in packaging and our expertise in food contact compliance, waterborne, energy curing and solvent borne technologies, provide DSM with a unique position. Based on our insights and technologies for inkjet primers, inks and overprint varnishes, DSM will present the potential of each resin technology for inkjet packaging applications.
    15:00
    Vinyl Methyl Oxazolidinone: A new reactive diluent for UV curable inks and coatings
    BASF
    VMOX, as BASF’s newly introduced functional vinyl monomer, creates exciting opportunities for formulating novel reactive diluent solutions in UV-EB curing applications. Compared to state-of-the-art diluents in the industry, VMOX has significant technical benefits over incumbent technologies such as being liquid at room temperature with a very low viscosity of 4 mPa/s (at 20oC), a low odor and favorable toxicological profile. Herein, VMOX’s high reactivity with acrylate copolymers, good adhesion properties on common plastic substrates along with high color response and enhanced color brilliance will be discussed in detail.
    15:30
    Handling inks in inkjet systems: Main requirements for liquid pumps
    Gardner Denver Thomas
    Pumping inks within an inkjet system is at the core of every drop-on-demand or continuous inkjet printer. Pumps support inkjet systems in achieving the highest possible uptime as well as ensuring great print quality by maintaining the ink composition and transferring inks gently to the printheads. Find out in this presentation how significant strides in pump reliability engineering can help bringing printers to market faster, and how to choose the right pump type for different requirements.
    16:00
    Coffee break and tabletop networking
    16:30
    First experimental study using a novel device for characterizing drop formation, drop substrate interaction, and waveform optimization
    Krüss
    Whereas, in our well received presentation at TheIJC 2017 we focused on the ink-substrate interplay and the ink surface tension, we will here focus on drop formation and printhead waveform optimisation. We briefly review the theoretical concepts of drop formation before we present an educational experimental study on various inks and model fluids using the novel KRÜSS DSA Inkjet instrument. The DSA Inkjet facilitates a continuous observation of the formation and flight of drops ejected by commercially available printheads. Printhead waveforms can be easily modified and possible resulting changes on drop formation are monitored instantaneously. By using model fluids with differently set viscosities or surface tensions, we illustrate the interplay of those two fluid parameters and the printhead waveform. Finally, we highlight how the DSA Inkjet facilitates a fast and reliable waveform optimisation of various inks using only small amounts of ink.
    17:00
    Filtration for inkjet ink
    ROKI S&S
    There are several types of printing methods and inks. Each ink has different properties, so the filtering purpose is different for each ink. For each filtering purpose, the appropriate types of filter should be selected. The common requirement for filter is to remove big size obstacles in the liquid, but another one is “separation” for inkjet ink. To pass the pigments or active particles through the filter is important to obtain high concentrated/proper color inks. Moreover, the separation performance is much required for unique shape of pigment ink filtration. In this presentation, we will talk about the appropriate filter for each ink and the separation filter performance.
    18:00
    Networking reception
  • DAY 2 – Track 1 (May 23, 2019)

    Time Topic Speaker(s) Company
    09:00
    Registration and tabletop networking
    10:00
    AWA Session: Global label and product decoration market
    AWA
    Based on AWA’s ongoing research and expertise in the labeling and product decoration market, the presentation will provide an overview of the global and regional label markets. A summary of volumes, the market structure, market characteristics by region, growth characteristics, and the competing labeling technologies; glue applied, pressure-sensitive, shrink sleeve, and in-mold will be covered. Highlights of key trends and developments in the labeling and product decoration market, and opportunities and threats outlined will feature the predominance of digital and inkjet printing in the sector.
    10:30
    AWA Session: Direct to container inkjet printing
    Krones
    Since 2006, Krones has been developing systems that allow companies to print directly onto bottles rather than using traditional labeling methods. Printing bottles at production speeds using UV inkjet technology has opened an entirely new era in container decoration allowing users to design their artwork around the contours of a bottle. It can take advantage of areas on the bottle that cannot be labeled with traditional methods such as printing into grooves and onto raised areas. Printing bottles on demand also eliminates the need to store pre-printed labels and allows new artwork to be implemented immediately. This presentation will take a look at the current state of this new, emerging and exciting next-generation container decoration technology.
    11:00
    Coffee break and tabletop networking
    11:30
    AWA Session: Conventional and inkjet printing trends and developments
    Gallus-Heidelberg
    Many suppliers have failed to satisfactorily fulfil their responsibility to support converters with the introduction of digital technology. Making the right decision can be difficult – which printing system is the right one for a label printer to choose? A hybrid system is created by combining different processes/systems designed for the same purpose, so that whichever is most suitable in a particular instance can be used. This combination inevitably requires complex interfaces, but offers a lot of opportunities regarding innovations e.g. embellishment and inline finishing processes in front of the digital print unit and after. The strengths of digital printing combined with inline finishing processes that have been specially optimised for digital printing enable the converters to varnish, embellish and further process labels inline – from the roll to the finished die-cut label in a single production operation.
    12:00
    AWA Session: Crystal: The development of a photopolymer based additive printing process
    ACTEGA
    Over the past decade, consumer backlash has grown significantly over single-use plastic packaging encompassing both flexible and rigid structures and labels. Global brands and retailers are now scrambling to respond. Increasingly aware of the scope of plastic pollution, governments in more than 60 countries have introduced levies and bans to combat single-use plastic waste which can be in the form of primary packaging that is used to protect, preserve, contain and inform the consumer. In many cases, primary packaging comes into direct contact with the consumed product itself such as beer, shampoo or cosmetics. This presentation will review “Crystal”, a print and apply technology which utilizes a photopolymer based additive manufacturing process on existing conventional printing assets to produce a unique no-label look decoration without a laminated face-stock on primary packaging. With Crystal, a low-waste, low-cost, premium no-label-look decoration is achievable at an overall much lower impact on the environment.
    12:30
    AWA Session: Inkjet application development progressing for shrink
    Mark Andy
    The presentation will look at the application segments which are not served but under development, their size, value and non-inkjet alternatives. We will the discuss the technical challenges of inkjet and the current state of technology. Finally, we will present future scenarios for the converters.
    13:00
    Lunch break and tabletop networking
    14:00
    Optimising complex rheological properties of inkjet inks for reliable jetting
    Trijet / University of Oxford
    Optimising bulk properties of inkjet inks to printhead specifications alone are no guide to achieving reliable jetting. Any minor changes in ink components or batch variations and conditions can drastically change high frequency complex rheology and extensional rheology. This affects (i) fluid flow dynamics in the printhead channel during waveform actuation, (ii) in-flight ligature break-up mechanism, and (iii) meniscus oscillation post-jetting. These are all critical to drop ejection characteristic, reliability and print frequency. As inkjet industry moves towards higher print frequencies and drop velocity to achieve higher productivity, the viscoelastic behaviour of ink in the channel at jetting frequencies, extensional rheology of jet at in-flight, nozzle recovery rate and turnover time post jetting becomes increasingly important. Attempting to jet from a fluid that has not fully recovered in the channel results in meniscus instability and poor reliability. We will present novel rheological tools capable of quantifying complex rheology of inkjet at relevant jetting timescale and geometry and their subsequent effect on the jetting behaviour. These techniques used prior to filling print heads, provide useful tools to differentiate between apparently identical inks but that show different jetting behaviour and recommend optimum jetting temperature and print frequency.
    14:30
    Round table discussion: The future
    TheIJC has become the conference of choice for universities and research institutes to present their inkjet-related research. The research is broad, reaching from the physics of fluid behavior to advanced applications such as printed electronics or pharmaceutical. We look back over five years of presentations and discuss the commercial impact of some of these key research projects.
    15:00
    Best speaker awards
  • DAY 2 – Track 2 (May 23, 2019)

    Time Topic Speaker(s) Company
    09:00
    Registration and tabletop networking
    10:00
    Quantitative stability analysis for ink and pigment formulations
    Formulaction
    Pigment, inkjet, paint, and coating dispersions possess inherent stability issues, typically in regards to sedimentation and packing of the particles in the suspension and visual phase separation. Such destabilizations can result in appearance and overall reception concerns for a customer or can directly correlate to problems associated with the manufacturing, production, and storage processes. Here, we will show how an optical device based upon Static Multiple Light Scattering can be used to quantify physical destabilization phenomena such as sedimentation, clarification, and flocculation all without sample preparation or dilution. While visual analysis can take days, weeks, or even months, full destabilization profiles on opaque samples can be generated in a high resolution fashion. This technique allows for facile modification of the mixtures to fit a stability profile as ingredients change or as new materials are developed and can help assist in packing and redispersibility analysis as well as shelf life predictions.
    10:30
    Industrial inkjet printing from the inkjet ink perspective
    Agfa
    Inkjet inks are a key element of an inkjet printing solution for industral applications. The ink tuning towards the print system is not the only task, tuning of the ink towards the application can be much more challenging. This requires not only that the ink in the print system meets the target specifications, but also that the ink and printed image is compatible with the processes before and after the print step. Real life examples of industrial applications will be explained from the ink perspective, focusing on ink tuning to the printing in function of the full production process.
    11:00
    Coffee break and tabletop networking
    11:30
    Impact on polymerization of UV DOD inks using different UV LED unit designs
    Hapa
    This presentation covers the results of a UV LED unit benchmark that details the performance differences of UV LED units from different suppliers. The results relate to UV curing inkjet applications only and are not applicable for other printing technologies. All measurements were obtained using the same parameters for each LED unit. The results are not intended as a rating of different UV LED suppliers since requirements are application specific. The results demonstrate the importance of the process development required for optimal polymerization of UV curing inks.
    12:00
    Ink and waveform performance optimization
    ImageXpert
    This presentation focuses on in-depth knowledge about how to design and optimize waveform which affects jetting performance. Waveforms are an essential, but often mysterious aspect of inkjet printing. Getting the proper rhythm of ink in the nozzle to ensure consistent, stable jetting is the goal when optimizing a waveform. This process was made easier with the invention of dropwatcher, as the behavior of drops using different waveforms could be analyzed more closely. Once identified on the dropwatcher, these parameters could further be tested by sample printing on a substrate using linear stage or vacuum belt and verifying the results by taking real time measurements of the printed sample using machine vision. ImageXpert will also provide brief overview of tools to automate the process for designing and optimizing waveforms with an objective to save time during the development phase.
    12:30
    Urethane acrylate design for low viscosity, energy curable inkjet ink applications
    Allnex
    Urethane acrylates provide useful properties to energy curable inkjet inks. Depending on their design, urethane acrylates can provide flexibility and toughness, or reactivity and hardness. Unfortunately, as an oligomer class, urethane acrylates tend to be very high in viscosity. A large portion of this viscosity can be attributed to hydrogen bonding. Other contributors are polyol viscosity, and isocyanate symmetry. This paper will explore the contributors to oligomer viscosity, and a class of low viscosity allophanate urethane acrylates will be presented.
    13:00
    Lunch break and tabletop networking
    14:00
    Partnering with inkjet OEMs on new product development and providing integrated modules for their machines
    Colin Rademacher Bürkert
    Choosing the correct valves and pumps guarantees perfect ink management in front of the printhead and delivers outstanding print quality with the highest level of precision. In this presentation, we will find out how it is possible to flush residue out of all the fluid channels, having no blockages caused by dried ink particles with a lightweight, compact, maintenance free and easy to replace valve.
    14:30
    Round table discussion on track 1
    15:00
    Best speaker awards
  • 1

Moderators

  • Paul Gardner


    BIO
  • Prof. Fritz Bircher

    The iPrint Institute, University of Western Switzerland
    BIO

  • Prof. Hitoshi Ujiie

    Center for Excellence in Surface Imaging, Thomas Jefferson University
    BIO
  • Dr Ronan Daly

    University of Cambridge
    BIO

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Next USA InkJet Conference

TheIJC USA 2019
May 22-23, 2019
Chicago O’Hare

About Us

TheIJC is a joint event by ESMA (European Specialist Manufacturers Association) and Digital Direct Technologies.

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